10:24 am - Mon, Aug 23, 2010
Q: Dude, did you go to that march in DC?
Anonymous

Yes I did! were you there?

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1:48 pm - Fri, Jul 23, 2010
49 notes

azspot:

Shortly after the law was passed in May, the ACLU brought a legal challenge to it with several other civil rights organizations. One of the plaintiffs in our challenge is Jim Shee, a U.S.-born 70-year-old American citizen of Spanish and Chinese descent who has already been stopped twice by local law enforcement officers in Arizona and asked to produce his “papers.” If the Arizona police are already exhibiting this behavior, it’s pretty easy to see that this extreme law, which practically begs police to engage in racial profiling, will lead to unnecessary police harassment of citizens based solely on the fact that they may look or sound like they are foreign. How else would police form a suspicion that someone was not in the U.S. legally?

The law has been condemned by high ranking law enforcement officials, including the Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police, who know first hand that the law will destroy the public trust necessary for police to do their jobs. People who are afraid that they will be questioned and forced to show papers because of the way they look will be much less likely to report crimes or serve as witnesses. Similarly, already stretched police officers will have to spend their time investigating whether someone is here legally rather than solving violent and other very serious crimes.

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10:59 am - Thu, Jul 22, 2010
7 notes
Diana Martinez, 18, an undocumented student, was one of 12 arrested after refusing to leave their sit-in in the Hart Senate Office building.
An estimated 65,000 illegal immigrants graduate from U.S. high schools each year.
The Washington Post-Mark Abramson

Diana Martinez, 18, an undocumented student, was one of 12 arrested after refusing to leave their sit-in in the Hart Senate Office building.

An estimated 65,000 illegal immigrants graduate from U.S. high schools each year.

The Washington Post-Mark Abramson

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2:34 am - Sun, Jul 18, 2010
25 notes

american-apologies:

Via AP:

“Minutemen groups, a surge in Border Patrol agents, and a tough new immigration law aren’t enough for a reputed neo-Nazi who’s now leading a militia in the Arizona desert.

Jason ‘J.T.’ Ready is taking matters into his own hands, declaring war on ‘narco-terrorists’ and keeping an eye out for illegal immigrants. So far, he says his patrols have only found a few border crossers who were given water and handed over to the Border Patrol. Once, they also found a decaying body in a wash, and alerted authorities.

But local law enforcement are nervous given that Ready’s group is heavily armed and identifies with the National Socialist Movement, an organization that believes only non-Jewish, white heterosexuals should be American citizens and that everyone who isn’t white should leave the country ‘peacefully or by force.’”

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3:12 am - Sat, Jul 17, 2010

@ations

Whoa small world! I’m heading from TX too! With the N. TX DREAM Team. What about you? Woohoo 20 hour bus rides! It’ll be worth it in the end tho :D

PS: I can’t figure out how to send a private msg or reply to a reply on here. not sure if its possible (still a noob, my bad) if anyone knows, please feel free to enlighten me. 

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7:50 pm - Fri, Jul 16, 2010
1 note
Q: Will you be in Washington D.C this upcoming week for the Dream Act activities?
ations-deactivated20100812-deac

Yes I will! I’m looking forward to it. :)

How bout yourself?

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10:00 am
7 notes
Defenders of SB 1070 often say that it merely allows the state to enforce federal immigration laws. But that’s not entirely accurate. In fact, it may not be even mostly accurate. SB 1070, in its intent clause, declares an immigration policy for the state of Arizona: “The legislature declares that the intent of this act is to make attrition through enforcement the public policy of all state and local government agencies in Arizona.” Attrition through enforcement is certainly not the immigration policy of the federal government. As the Obama administration’s lawsuit makes clear, the federal policy is to use its discretion under federal law to treat illegal presence in the country as a civil, not a criminal, matter. And to prioritize enforcement resources on those who are a threat to public safety, not those just working and living here illegally. The lawsuit alleges that the Arizona law, by attempting (probably futilely) to make illegal presence a state criminal offense, contradicts this federal policy and practice.

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3:11 am

"They can’t get citizenship or in-state tuition rates, so they’re taking the next steps — the Capitol and White House steps, that is.

A coalition of student immigrant advocacy groups in Massachusetts, Colorado and California on Wednesday launched a makeshift school in the nation’s capital, reminiscent of the “teach-ins” of the 1960s, to encourage a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants through college enrollment.”

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2:53 am
LOVE IT
shakepaper:

adailyriot:

ohhhkay:

Brown and Proud
Melanie Cervantes

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1:23 am - Tue, Jul 13, 2010
3 notes

A look at the intersection between indigenous and immigrant narratives.  

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